Archaeological Institute of America
Western Illinois Society
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
2021-2022

Click on Lecture Titles for More Details
Click here for pdf version.

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

Thursday, September 16, 2021
"Feeding Cahokia"

James Godde, Professor of Biology, Monmouth College (jgodde@monmouthcollege.edu)
and Lucas Jones MC'22

7:30 pm at the Warren County History Museum, 238 S. Sunny Lane, Monmouth, IL 61462
Also available live via Zoom:
Link to meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6071788810?pwd=NXZ5R2h0ZG5qcUdnbXlKbjFtM2poZz09 
Meeting ID 607 178 8810
Passcode 3xQ8D4

Wednesday, October 20, 2021
"Illuminating the Past:  An Application of Data Science to Archaeology"
An
International Archaeology Day Event

Michael C. Sostarecz, Professor of Mathematics, Monmouth College (msostarecz@gmail.com)
7:30 pm at the Warren County History Museum, 238 S. Sunny Lane, Monmouth, IL 61462

 

Wednesday, November 3, 2021
"Archaeology through Art: Early Modern Japanese Ship Construction"
Michelle Damian, Assistant Professor of History, Monmouth College (mdamian@monmouthcollege.edu)

7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401

 

Thursday, November 18, 2021

"Masada: From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth"

Sienkewicz Lecture on Roman Archaeology

Jodi Magness, Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (magness@email.unc.edu)
7:30 pm, Pattee Auditorium, Room 100 Center for Science and Business (CSB), Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 6142

    

Tuesday, March 1, 2022
"In the Footsteps of Roman Soldiers: Excavations at Vindolanda and the Archaeological Landscape of Hadrian’s Wall"

Elizabeth M. Greene, Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology, University of Western Ontario (egreene2@uwo.ca)
7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401

 

Wednesday, March 2, 2022
"The Social Life of Roman Soldiers: The Role of Wives, Children and Families in Roman Military Communities"
Elizabeth M. Greene, Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology, University of Western Ontario (egreene2@uwo.ca)
7:30 pm, Pattee Auditorium, Room 100 Center for Science and Business (CSB), Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 6142

 

Tuesday, April 26, 2022

"Dreams, Drugs, and Fumigations: Doctoring in Ancient Athens"
Susan Rotroff, Jarvis Thurston & Mona Van Duyn Professor Emerita, Washington University, St. Louis (srotroff@wustl.edu)
7:30 pm, 102 Hanson Hall of Science, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL 61201

 

Wednesday, April 27, 2022
"Ritual at the Crossroads: A Sacred Stone in Ancient Athens"
Susan Rotroff, Jarvis Thurston & Mona Van Duyn Professor Emerita, Washington University, St. Louis (srotroff@wustl.edu)
7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401

 

2021-2022 Lecture Descriptions

 

Thursday, September 16, 2021
"Feeding Cahokia"

James Godde, Professor of Biology, Monmouth College (jgodde@monmouthcollege.edu)

and Lucas Jones MC'22

Every year, the Biology Department at Monmouth College teaches a half-semester course entitled Topics in the History of Biology. This past fall, the specific focus was “Feeding Cahokia: Agricultural Technology of Native Americans during the Mississippian Period". The class focused on a book written by Gayle J. Fritz, emeritus professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. Lectures typically took place outdoors at the Monmouth City Cemetery, with trips to LeSuer Nature Preserve, the Monmouth College garden, as well as the Monmouth College farm. Sometimes the class met indoors in the CSB Nutrition Lab where we cooked some of the dishes that Cahokian peoples may have eaten. The class culminated with a trip to Cahokia itself in order to see the location that we had studied for the preceding 7 weeks.

Flyer
7:30 pm at the Warren County History Museum, 238 S. Sunny Lane, Monmouth, IL 61462
Also available live via Zoom:
Link to meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6071788810?pwd=NXZ5R2h0ZG5qcUdnbXlKbjFtM2poZz09 
Meeting ID 607 178 8810
Passcode 3xQ8D4

 

Wednesday, October 20, 2021
"Illuminating the Past:  An Application of Data Science to Archaeology"
An
International Archaeology Day Event

Michael C. Sostarecz, Professor of Mathematics, Monmouth College (msostarecz@gmail.com)
Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) is an imaging technique used to non-invasively bring out surface details on artifacts.  This lecture will share improvements on how the data is collected, an original model to combine the experimental images, and new options for post-processing.  The artifacts presented will include Greco-Egyptian pottery from the Ashmolean and British Museums, arrow points from Monmouth College’s Native American Lithic Collection, and Greek coins from the College’s Shields Collection.  With a focus on qualitative comparisons to current models for RTI, this presentation will be geared towards a general audience.  Planned extensions of the project involve forensic science, dinosaurs, and scuba diving, albeit probably not at the same time.

7:30 pm at the Warren County History Museum, 238 S. Sunny Lane, Monmouth, IL 61462

 

Wednesday, November 3, 2021
"Archaeology through Art: Early Modern Japanese Ship Construction"
Michelle Damian, Assistant Professor of History, Monmouth College (mdamian@monmouthcollege.edu)

Maritime trade and transport flourished during Japan’s early modern (Edo, 1603 – 1868) period, connecting the urban centers of Osaka and Edo with the farthest reaches of Hokkaido and Kyushu. The omnipresent nature and variety of styles of boats, from local ferries, to fishing vessels, to large trade ships are recorded diligently in hundreds of woodblock prints by numerous different artists. Careful analysis of the construction styles and contexts of these vessels in the prints, in conjunction with contemporary ships’ treatises, extant artifacts in museum collections, and ethnographic research suggests that shipwrights strove to create visually striking watercraft that were adapted to the waters they plied. This lecture will highlight some of the distinctive features of Japanese ship construction and explore the role that different vessels play in the early modern maritime cultural landscape. 
7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401

 

Thursday, November 18, 2021

"Masada: From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth"

Sienkewicz Lecture on Roman Archaeology

Jodi Magness, Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (magness@email.unc.edu)
In the first century B.C.E., Herod the Great, who ruled Judea as client king on behalf of Rome, built a fortified palace atop the mountain of Masada overlooking the Dead Sea.  Seventy years after Herod's death, the First Jewish Revolt against Rome broke out and Jewish rebels occupied Masada.  According to the ancient historian Flavius Josephus, at the end of the revolt the Romans besieged the mountain and the Jewish rebels committed mass suicide.  In this slide-illustrated lecture, we survey the history and archaeology of Masada, including the results of excavations in the Roman siege works which Professor Jodi Magness co-directed in 1995.  We conclude by considering the current debates surrounding Josephus’s mass suicide story.

7:30 pm, Pattee Auditorium, Room 100 Center for Science and Business (CSB), Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 6142

    

Tuesday, March 1, 2021
"In the Footsteps of Roman Soldiers: Excavations at Vindolanda and the Archaeological Landscape of Hadrian’s Wall"

Elizabeth M. Greene, Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology, University of Western Ontario (egreene2@uwo.ca)
In the past few decades the Roman fort at Vindolanda has had some of the most extraordinary finds from the northern frontier of the Roman Empire that have truly changed our understanding of life in the Roman army. The site lies near Hadrian’s Wall in a remote countryside in Northumberland, England and was part of the original frontier line in this location in the late first century CE. Decades of excavation at the site have given us an extraordinary view into the lives of soldiers living in this frontier region. Greene has excavated at Vindolanda since 2002, directing trenches in new areas of the site for several years, and will give a presentation focusing on the recent excavations and new hypotheses from this work. Highlights of the presentation concentrate on the extraordinary finds from thesite, including Roman shoes, numerous inscriptions and artifacts, as well as the unparalleled corpus of writing tablets (letters and military records), to reveal what life was like on the edge of the Roman empire and how the site has changed many accepted views of life in the Roman army.
7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401

 

Wednesday, March 2, 2022
"The Social Life of Roman Soldiers: The Role of Wives, Children and Families in Roman Military Communities"
Elizabeth M. Greene, Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology, University of Western Ontario (egreene2@uwo.ca)
Research over the past few decades has shown quite clearly that women and children were part of life in the Roman army far more than had ever been considered before. The evidence and spatial patterning of material within and outside Roman forts makes this clear, but still research on the social role of these individuals lags behind. This presentation concentrates on Dr. Greene’s current research into this aspect of the Roman army, considering the evidence that illuminates the varied roles of non-combatants within these somewhat unique settlements. The presentation highlights the very different realities for the wives and children of officers and the family members of, for instance, a foot soldier, who was paid far less and was not legally allowed to contract a marriage while serving. This lecture follows on past talks I have given that present the archaeological evidence for the presence of women at Vindolanda and pushes the argument toward women’s social roles within military communities and the intersectional identities of those living in the Roman provinces and in military communities on the frontiers.

7:30 pm, Pattee Auditorium, Room 100 Center for Science and Business (CSB), Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 6142

 

Tuesday, April 26, 2022

"Dreams, Drugs, and Fumigations: Doctoring in Ancient Athens"
Susan Rotroff, Jarvis Thurston & Mona Van Duyn Professor Emerita, Washington University, St. Louis (srotroff@wustl.edu)
In ancient Athens, as today, people got sick. Suffering from anything from epidemic disease and accidents to chronic illness and passing indisposition, they required treatment. Much of what we know about that treatment comes from texts, particularly the body of medical lore known as the Hippocratic Corpus, which began to be written down in the 5th century BC. But the practice of medicine also left an archaeological trail, from the well-known healing sanctuaries to simple artifacts associated with medical treatment. This lecture examines some of this evidence, focusing particularly on objects preserved in the trash-heaps of Athens (and other cities) -- including the equipment of a family of healers who lived just to the south of the city’s agora (public square) -- to shed a more intimate light on the practice and practitioners of the healing arts.

7:30 pm, 102 Hanson Hall of Science, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL 61201

 

Wednesday, April 27, 2022
"Ritual at the Crossroads: A Sacred Stone in Ancient Athens"
Susan Rotroff, Jarvis Thurston & Mona Van Duyn Professor Emerita, Washington University, St. Louis (srotroff@wustl.edu)
A large, irregular boulder fenced off by a parapet of stone slabs lies at a crossroads on the north side of the Agora (the public square) of ancient Athens. When excavated, in the 1970s, I, t was covered with hundreds of small vessels, placed there in the latter part of the 5th century BCE, along with an eclectic collection of unusual objects, including gilded pebbles, knucklebones, writing styli, and fragments of broken sculpture. The lecturer and her colleagues at the Agora have embarked on a detailed study of the monument, now nicknamed the Crossroads Enclosure. Although it was located at one of the busiest spots in the city, its ancient identity remains a mystery. This lecture examines the architecture, contents, position, and environment of the Enclosure, looking for clues to that identity and the nature of the rituals and other activities that took place there, and placing it within its historical context in the turbulent last decades of the 5th century BCE.
7:30 pm, Trustees' Room (Room 302), Alumni Hall, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401